DURING Reading Strategies

  • The following strategies are useful to apply DURING reading a text in the high school classroom.

    Chunking the Text


    What is it?

    Breaking up the text into smaller portions (chunks) makes reading longer excerpts managable for students.

    How it Works

    Divide the page into sections with a horizontal line. Initially, the teacher may model how to chunk the text, but eventually, students can take responsibility to chunk the text to their liking.

    Coding the Text


    What is it?

    Text coding is a strategy used to help students keep track of thinking while they are reading.

    How it Works

    Students use a simple coding system to mark the text and record what they are thinking either in the margins or on post-it notes. As students make connections, self-question, and respond to what they reading, they are self-monitoring their comprehension and enhancing long term understanding. The codes help students name and remember a particular thinking strategy and track the thinking throughout the text. Following are options for students to use while coding text. Click here to see RTSD standardized codes.

    Apply an App

    Use iBooks to code text. *Coding a PDF using iBooks is not possible.

    Annotating the Text


    What is It?

    Annotating, or marking the text with notes is an essential way to make the most out of a reading. Annotations make it easy to find important information quickly when looking back and reviewing a text. By annotating a text, reading becomes an active process and can provide integral information for responses, whether they be discussions or writings.

    How it Works

    1. Ideally, read through a text once before making annotations, circling unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts.
      WHY? This enables a clear idea of where major ideas and important information are in a text.
    2. On the second read, paraphrase important ideas in the margins, into a few ORIGINAL words.
      WHY? This helps to demonstrate understanding of ideas and provides a handy summary on the pages of the text.
    3. Note your reactions-agreement/disagreements, questions, personal experiences, connections to other texts or the world.
      WHY? This aids in formulating ORIGINAL ideas for writing assignments.

    Apply an App

    Open up an electronic version of the text in Notability and annotate away! The app provides multiple means for marking up a reading, to include voice recording and speech-to-text features.

    Double Entry Journaling (CORNELL NOTES)


    What is it?

    The Double-Entry Journal strategy enables students to record their responses to text as they read. The purpose of this strategy is to give students the opportunity to express their thoughts and become actively involved with the material they read.

    How it Works

    Students write down phrases or sentences from their assigned reading and then write their own reaction, connection, or questions related to that passage. Steps are as follows:

    1. Students fold a piece of paper in half, lengthwise.
    2. In the left hand column, the students write a phrase or sentence from the selection that was particularly meaningful to them, along with the page number.
    3. In the right hand column, the students react to the passage by writing personal responses to the quotes on the left. The entry may include a comment, a question, a connection made, or an analysis.
    4. Students can share their responses with the class or literature discussion group.

    Click here for a PDF of version 1.
    Click here for a PDF of version 2.

    As you can see from the steps above, students can create their own DEJ on scrap paper.

    Apply an App

    Create a table in Pages for your Double Entry Journal. Use Notability to hand sketch a table. Or open one of the above documents in Notability and begin typing.

    Questioning


    What is it?

    Readers often underestimate their responsibility during reading. But, it is imperative readers engage in their text. Questioning is the perfect mode, helping students clarify and deepen their understanding of what they are reading. If they do not have questions on what they are reading, they have no purpose to read the text.

    How it Works

    Readers purposefully and spontaneously ask questions during (or before/after) reading. Teacher modeling of this strategy is helpful. Remind students questions begin with the 5Ws and 1H words - WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY, and HOW. Prompt students to ask surface questions first - basic story elements. Then, encourage more thoughtful and analytical questions.

    A special thanks to Adlit.org and readwritethink.org